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Radio Broadcast - The Rape of Lucretia

Saturday November 17, 2012

 



Overview

The Rape of Lucretia
November 17 at noon
91.7 FM Houston Classical Radio or WFMT Radio Network

An Opera in Two Acts. Music by Benjamin Britten. Libretto by Ronald Duncan. Sung in English


The writings of historians Livy and Dionysius of Halicarnassus tell the story of Lucretia, a Roman officer's wife whose very purity inflamed the lust of Prince Tarquinius of Rome and whose rape incited the overthrow of the Roman monarchy. In Britten's opera, Tarquinius comes to her home while her husband is away in the army camp, asks for lodging, and violently attacks her during the night. Unable to bear her shame, Lucretia kills herself.

Cast (in order of appearance)
Male Chorus - Anthony Dean Griffey
Female Chorus - Leah Crocetto
Collatinus - Ryan McKinny
Junius - Joshua Hopkins
Tarquinius - Jacques Imbrailo
Lucretia - Michelle DeYoung
Bianca - Judith Forst
Lucia - Lauren Snouffer
First Violin - Denise Tarrant
Second Violin - Erica Robinson
Viola Eliseo - Rene Salazar
Cello - Barrett Sills
Double Bass - Dennis Whittaker
Flute/Piccolo/Alto Flute - Mercedes Smith
Oboe/English Horn - Elizabeth Priestly Siffert
Clarinet/Bass Clarinet - Carol Stinson
Bassoon - Thomas DeWitt
French Horn - Sarah Cranston
Harp - Joan Eidman
Timpani - Nancy Nelson
Percussion - Richard Brown
Keyboard - Bethany Self

Creative Team
Conductor - Rory Macdonald
Director - Arin Arbus
Set Designer - Jean-Guy Lecat
Costume Designer - Anita Yavich
Lighting Designer - Michael James Clark
Fight Director - Brian Byrnes

Synopsis

ACT I

The Male Chorus and the Female Chorus tell the story of how Etruscan upstart Tarquinius Superbus has become the ruler of Rome by using intrigue and murder to acquire power. His son, Prince Tarquinius Sextus, is the commander of a Roman army, which is at war with the Greeks.

In the army's camp, two Roman commanders, Collatinus and Junius, are drinking with Prince Tarquinius and discussing the outcome of a bet they made the night before. In order to see how faithful their wives were in their absence, they and several other commanders had returned to Rome unannounced, but the only one who was at home, uncompromised, was Lucretia, the wife of Collatinus. The general praise lavished on Lucretia for her chastity makes Junius, who is very ambitious, jealous of Collatinus' good fortune. He keeps on insisting to Tarquinius that women can never be faithful until the prince decides to prove Lucretia chaste and sets off for Rome.

The Male Chorus describes Tarquinius' ride through the night.

Lucretia is sitting at home in the company of her two servants Bianca and Lucia. Tarquinius knocks at the door and asks Lucretia to give him lodging for the night. As the rules of etiquette require of her, Lucretia complies with his request and offers him her hospitality.

ACT II

The Female and Male Chorus tell about the violent rule of the much-hated Etruscan kings in Rome. There is rebellion in the air.

In the night, Tarquinius wakens Lucretia from sleep and tries to seduce her. When she resists him, he rapes her and then returns to the camp.

The Female and Male Chorus offer a Christian commentary on “virtue assailed by sin.”

The next morning, Bianca and Lucia are arranging flowers. Lucretia, in distress, orders Lucia to send for Collatinus, but Collatinus, alerted by Junius to Tarquinius' departure for Rome, anticipates the messenger. When he arrives, accompanied by Junius, Lucretia tells all who are present what happened during the night. Although Collatinus exonerates her from all blame, Lucretia kills herself. This is the moment Junius has been waiting for. He puts Lucretia's corpse on public display to incite the people to rebel against the Etruscans in order to seize power himself.

The Female and Male Chorus search for a meaning to the tragedy.

First published by Bavarian State Opera; used by permission.

HGO Performance History:
Britten's The Rape of Lucretia is presented at HGO for the first time on the main stage. It was performed as an HGO Studio production in 1979. 

The Rape of Lucretia
November 17 at noon
91.7 FM Houston Classical Radio or WFMT Radio Network

An Opera in Two Acts. Music by Benjamin Britten. Libretto by Ronald Duncan. Sung in English


The writings of historians Livy and Dionysius of Halicarnassus tell the story of Lucretia, a Roman officer's wife whose very purity inflamed the lust of Prince Tarquinius of Rome and whose rape incited the overthrow of the Roman monarchy. In Britten's opera, Tarquinius comes to her home while her husband is away in the army camp, asks for lodging, and violently attacks her during the night. Unable to bear her shame, Lucretia kills herself.

Cast (in order of appearance)
Male Chorus - Anthony Dean Griffey
Female Chorus - Leah Crocetto
Collatinus - Ryan McKinny
Junius - Joshua Hopkins
Tarquinius - Jacques Imbrailo
Lucretia - Michelle DeYoung
Bianca - Judith Forst
Lucia - Lauren Snouffer
First Violin - Denise Tarrant
Second Violin - Erica Robinson
Viola Eliseo - Rene Salazar
Cello - Barrett Sills
Double Bass - Dennis Whittaker
Flute/Piccolo/Alto Flute - Mercedes Smith
Oboe/English Horn - Elizabeth Priestly Siffert
Clarinet/Bass Clarinet - Carol Stinson
Bassoon - Thomas DeWitt
French Horn - Sarah Cranston
Harp - Joan Eidman
Timpani - Nancy Nelson
Percussion - Richard Brown
Keyboard - Bethany Self

Creative Team
Conductor - Rory Macdonald
Director - Arin Arbus
Set Designer - Jean-Guy Lecat
Costume Designer - Anita Yavich
Lighting Designer - Michael James Clark
Fight Director - Brian Byrnes

ACT I

The Male Chorus and the Female Chorus tell the story of how Etruscan upstart Tarquinius Superbus has become the ruler of Rome by using intrigue and murder to acquire power. His son, Prince Tarquinius Sextus, is the commander of a Roman army, which is at war with the Greeks.

In the army's camp, two Roman commanders, Collatinus and Junius, are drinking with Prince Tarquinius and discussing the outcome of a bet they made the night before. In order to see how faithful their wives were in their absence, they and several other commanders had returned to Rome unannounced, but the only one who was at home, uncompromised, was Lucretia, the wife of Collatinus. The general praise lavished on Lucretia for her chastity makes Junius, who is very ambitious, jealous of Collatinus' good fortune. He keeps on insisting to Tarquinius that women can never be faithful until the prince decides to prove Lucretia chaste and sets off for Rome.

The Male Chorus describes Tarquinius' ride through the night.

Lucretia is sitting at home in the company of her two servants Bianca and Lucia. Tarquinius knocks at the door and asks Lucretia to give him lodging for the night. As the rules of etiquette require of her, Lucretia complies with his request and offers him her hospitality.

ACT II

The Female and Male Chorus tell about the violent rule of the much-hated Etruscan kings in Rome. There is rebellion in the air.

In the night, Tarquinius wakens Lucretia from sleep and tries to seduce her. When she resists him, he rapes her and then returns to the camp.

The Female and Male Chorus offer a Christian commentary on “virtue assailed by sin.”

The next morning, Bianca and Lucia are arranging flowers. Lucretia, in distress, orders Lucia to send for Collatinus, but Collatinus, alerted by Junius to Tarquinius' departure for Rome, anticipates the messenger. When he arrives, accompanied by Junius, Lucretia tells all who are present what happened during the night. Although Collatinus exonerates her from all blame, Lucretia kills herself. This is the moment Junius has been waiting for. He puts Lucretia's corpse on public display to incite the people to rebel against the Etruscans in order to seize power himself.

The Female and Male Chorus search for a meaning to the tragedy.

First published by Bavarian State Opera; used by permission.

HGO Performance History:
Britten's The Rape of Lucretia is presented at HGO for the first time on the main stage. It was performed as an HGO Studio production in 1979. 


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