1
of

Show Boat

Friday January 18, 2013 - Saturday February 9, 2013

Brown Theater, Wortham Theater Center  



Overview

 


Jerome Kern's Show Boat
Book and Lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II
Sung in English 

Jan. 18, 2013 - 7:30 p.m. | Jan. 20, 2013 - 2 p.m. | Jan. 26, 2013 - 7:30 p.m.
Jan. 30, 2013 - 7:30 p.m. | Feb. 1, 2013 - 7:30 p.m. | Feb. 3, 2013 - 2 p.m.
Feb. 6, 2013 - 7:30 p.m. | Feb. 9, 2013 - 7:30 p.m.

Ol' Man River — he just keeps rolling along. Show Boat follows the theatrical family of The Cotton Blossom as it sails the Mississippi providing musical entertainment at towns along the river. A magical score and epic story make Show Boat a seminal work of the musical theater with a uniquely American accent.

A co-production with Lyric Opera of Chicago, San Francisco Opera, and Washington National Opera
Photo credit: Peter Davison

Synopsis

ACT I

Scene 1: The levee at Natchez on the Mississippi during the late 1880s
A show boat, the Cotton Blossom, is in town. When the boat's cook, Queenie, arrives from the market, Pete, the engineer, demands to know who gave her the brooch she's wearing, but she responds evasively. Stevedores and townsfolk assert that workers get no rest because of the show boat. Steve Baker, the boat's leading actor, has placed near the gangplank a picture frame showing his wife, leading lady Julie LaVerne. Pete steals the picture and stealthily heads for the towboat.

A crowd gathers to hear Captain Andy Hawks's description of the evening's show. Pete is furious that Julie gave his gift to her— the brooch— to Queenie. Seeing Pete pestering Julie, Steve exchanges blows with Pete, who is then fired by Captain Andy. Parthy, Andy's wife, despises show people and warns Julie to have nothing to do with her daughter, Magnolia. Ellie May Chipley, the company's comedienne, fails to persuade Andy to give her dramatic roles if Julie leaves the company.

A dashing gambler, Gaylord Ravenal, appears on the levee. He tells Sheriff Vallon he's there for a short time, but Vallon warns him not to stay more than twenty-four hours. Ravenal reflects on his carefree nature (“Who Cares If My Boat Goes Upstream?”). Suddenly, he sees Magnolia and is instantly captivated (“Make Believe”). When Vallon announces that the judge would like to see Ravenal, he excuses himself politely. Magnolia asks Joe, a worker on the show boat, whether he knows the young man she was talking to. He doesn't, but he's seen his kind before on the river. She rushes off to find Julie. Joe believes the river will know— it knows everything (“Ol' Man River”).

Scene 2: The show boat's kitchen
Magnolia tells Julie she's in love, although she doesn't know the young man's name. Julie worries that he's a “no-account river feller.” If he were, answers Magnolia, she'd stop loving him, but Julie knows otherwise and sings a song expressing her feelings (“Can't Help Lovin' Dat Man”). Queenie—surprised that Julie knows the song—adds her own exasperated verse about Joe.

Scene 3: Outside a waterfront saloon
Ravenal declares that if he loses at gambling today, he knows that things will go better for him later (“Till Good Luck Comes My Way”).

Scene 4: The show boat's stage
Queenie and the boat's workers sing a song about keeping unhappiness far away (“Mis‘ry's Comin' Aroun'”). Julie begins singing it herself, but as everyone joins with her, she suddenly cries out, “Stop singing that rotten song!” She manages to rehearse with Andy, Steve, and the company's resident villain, Frank Schultz.

Ellie, arriving late, whispers something in Steve's ear. When he whispers it to Julie, she collapses. Knowing the sheriff is on his way, Steve pulls out a knife, cuts Julie's finger, and sucks blood from it. Vallon arrives, informing Andy that in Mississippi it is unlawful for a Negro woman to marry a white man. In this case, he accuses Julie (whose last name he identifies as “Dozier”) and Steve, who defiantly responds that he has Negro blood in him. Vallon advises that Andy cancel that evening's performance and departs. To Magnolia's dismay, Steve and Julie—intending to leave the company—go off to pack. Andy plans to cancel the performance, but wonders about tomorrow. He decides to assign Julie's role to Magnolia, who knows all the lines. To play opposite her, Frank suggests a gentleman he just met. He brings in Ravenal, who is immediately hired. Julie says goodbye to Magnolia, who sadly begins rehearsing with the enraptured Ravenal.

Scene 5: In front of the show boat's box office
Ellie sings to the Natchez girls about the sacrifices one makes in being an actress (“Life on the Wicked Stage”). Queenie goes into a vigorous sales pitch for the show (“Queenie's Ballyhoo”).

Scene 6: Stage of the show boat
A melodrama is performed, with the embrace between “Parson Brown” (Ravenal) and “Miss Lucy” (Magnolia) drawing enthusiastic applause. When Frank, as the villain, grabs Magnolia, a patron shoots his gun in outrage!

Scene 7: The show boat's upper deck
Knowing Parthy will be preoccupied and unable to interfere, Ravenal convinces Magnolia to marry him the next day. The two are ecstatic (“You Are Love”).

Scene 8: The levee
The public is invited to the wedding. Magnolia and Ravenal are headed for a Natchez church when Parthy rushes in with Vallon and Pete. Everyone is shocked when Parthy accuses Ravenal of having killed a man the year before. Vallon admits that Ravenal got off on self-defense, at which Andy expresses no objection, admitting that when he was nineteen he, too, killed a man. Hearing that Magnolia and Ravenal are going to marry, Parthy faints. Andy declares that the wedding can now proceed.

ACT II

Scene 1: Chicago World's Fair – 1893
Ravenal and Magnolia make merry with Chicagoans, dazzled by the Columbian Exposition (“When the Sports of Gay Chicago”). Feeling that luck is with him, Ravenal goes off to gamble.
Scene 2. A suite at the Palmer House, Chicago
Life feels blissful for Magnolia and Ravenal (“Why Do I Love You?”).

Scene 3: The show boat
Andy reads Parthy their daughter's letter describing her life with Ravenal. Parthy disapproves of how much they are spending on luxuries. Andy proposes a trip to Chicago to see the Ravenals and Kim, their daughter.

Scene 4: A room on Ontario Street, Chicago, 1904
At a boarding house, Frank and Ellie ask the landlady about renting a room. Incensed that her current occupants haven't paid their rent in weeks, Mrs. O'Brien is planning to get rid of them. She reveals, too, that the man is a gambler and that everything he and his wife own has been pawned. Frank and Ellie are astonished when Magnolia arrives. She explains that these are temporary quarters, prior to her moving with Ravenal to the lake shore. Sensing that Magnolia needs money, Frank offers to get her a job singing. Mrs. O'Brien hands Magnolia a letter from Ravenal, enclosing money for Kim's school expenses. With nothing left to pawn and no more friends to lend them money, Ravenal is leaving Magnolia, hoping she and Kim will return to Andy and Parthy. Magnolia tells Frank and Ellie she refuses to live on charity while enduring her mother's disapproval.

Scene 5: St. Agatha's convent, Chicago
Ravenal explains to Kim that he must soon leave for “a business trip.” Kim tells her father that when she misses him, she does what he always told her to do – she pretends that they're together (Reprise: “Make Believe”).

Scene 6: The Trocadero Club
Jake, the pianist, tells Max, the owner, that Julie, their singer, is having a tough time: Steve has just left her, saying he couldn't compete with the other man in her life—“Johnnie Walker.” When Julie appears, Max threatens that if she misses the evening's show, she'll be out of a job. She rehearses a new song (“Bill”). Frank, recently hired with Ellie as the Trocadero's comedy act, asks Max to audition Magnolia. Seeing how lovely she is, he consents. She sings the song she'd heard Julie sing years before (Reprise: “Can't Help Lovin' Dat Man”). Julie is startled to hear her voice and then to see her, although Magnolia has no idea her old friend is there. Having made her decision, Julie leaves.

Magnolia's singing pleases Max, but he upsets her by saying he dislikes the song. The maître d' appears with a message from Julie—she's “going on a tear.” Max fires her, but there's more to the message: Julie suggests he hire the girl who just auditioned. Frank encourages Magnolia to try her song at a livelier tempo, and when she does so, Max gives her the job.

Scene 7: Lobby of the Palmer House, Chicago
Having arrived in time for New Year's Eve, Parthy and Andy can't locate the Ravenals, who they thought were staying at the Palmer House. Parthy goes off in search of them, while Andy flirts with some attractive ladies.

Scene 8: The Trocadero Club – New Year's Eve
The club's orchestra and dancers perform (“Washington Post March”), followed by Ellie and Frank (“I Might Fall Back on You”). Astonished to see Andy, Frank tells him that Ravenal has left Magnolia, who is now performing at the club. Max informs the audience that “Julie Wendell” will be replaced by Magnolia Ravenal, who quietly begins a sweetly sentimental waltz song (“After the Ball”). Seeing Andy in the audience increases her confidence, and by the end the crowd is singing along with her. She embraces her father as everyone shouts, “Happy New Year!”

Scene 9: In front of the Natchez Evening Democrat
Joe reflects on the never-changing Mississippi River (Reprise: “Ol' Man River”).

Scene 10: A Broadway theater
An emcee introduces Magnolia, now a great star. She sings two songs for the Ziegfeld Follies audience (“Nobody Else But You”).

Scene 11: Outside the show boat
Ravenal meets Andy, who informs him of Magnolia's European successes and that she is, in fact, on the show boat this very evening. Ravenal sadly recalls his love for Magnolia (Reprise: “You Are Love”).

Scene 12: Levee at Greenville—1927
After forty years together on the show boat, Queenie remains as frustrated as ever with Joe. When a woman compliments her on her dress, she reveals that it was a present from a Broadway star, Miss Ravenal. She delights the Greenville crowd with a song from Kim's latest show (“Hey, Feller!”).
As the audience leaves following the show boat's evening performance, Magnolia sees Ravenal. He is about to beg forgiveness when an old lady, recognizing Magnolia, interrupts. She remembers Magnolia's debut performance, the handsome young man who looked at her with such feeling, and the loving way she gazed at him. “And to think, it was only make believe,” murmurs the lady, bidding Magnolia good night.

Ravenal is again begging forgiveness when Magnolia sees Kim, who rushes to embrace her father. For one moment the family is united, as Joe's voice is heard once again (Finale: “Ol' Man River”).

Reprinted by permission of Lyric Opera of Chicago.


Sinópsis

 

ACTO I

Escena 1: El dique en Natchez, Mississippi a finales de 1880
Un barco de entretenimiento llamado Cotton Blossom ha llegado al pueblo. Cuando Queenie, la cocinera del barco regresa del mercado, el maquinista, Pete, le exije a esta que le diga quién le regaló el broche que trae puesto, pero ella le responde evasiva. Los obreros del puerto junto con la gente del pueblo afirman que no tienen ningún descanso a causa del barco. Steve Baker, el actor principal del barco ha puesto en la pasarela una foto de su esposa, la actriz principal Julie La Verne. Pete se roba la foto a hurtadillas dirigiéndose hacia el remolque.

Una multitud se reúne para escuchar al Capitán Andy Hawk en su descripción del espectáculo de la noche, Pete está furioso por que Julie le regaló el broche que él le dió a Queenie. Cuando Steve mira a Pete molestando a Julie, este comienza una golpiza con Pete, quien después es despedido por el Capitán Andy. La esposa de Andy, Parthy, siente aberración por el mundo del espectáculo y su gente y le advierte a Julie que no quiere que ella tenga nada que ver con su hija Magnolia. Ellie May Chipley, la comediante de la compañía, fracasa en su intento de convencer a Andy que le de los papeles dramáticos si es que Julie deja a la compañía.

Gaylord Ravenal, un apuesto jugador aparece en el dique y le cuenta al Sheriff Vallon que se quedará por poco tiempo, pero el Sheriff le advierte no quedarse por mas de veinticuatro horas. Ravenal reflexiona acerca de su actitud despreocupada ("Who Cares If My Boat Goes Upstream?"). De pronto, Ravenal mira a Magnolia y queda cautivado instantáneamente ("Make Believe"). Cuando Vallon anuncia que el juez quiere ver a Ravenal, este se retira cortésmente. Magnolia le pregunta a Joe, un trabajador del barco si es que conoce al joven hombre con quien ella estaba hablando. Este le dice que no lo conoce pero ha visto a muchos de su tipo en el río. Magnolia se apresura a buscando a Julie. Joe cree que el río lo sabrá. El río lo sabe todo. ("Ol' Man River").

Escena 2: La cocina del barco
Magnolia le cuenta a Julie que está enamorada, aunque aún no conozca el nombre del joven. A Julie le preocupa que pueda ser un tipo del río, de esos que no son de "fiar". Si así fuera, Magnolia replica, lo dejaría de amar, pero Julie sabe que no es asi y canta una canción expresando sus sentimientos ("Can't Help Lovin' Dat Man"). Queenie, sorprendida al ver que Julie conoce la canción, añade su propio verso exasperado acerca de Joe. 

Escena 3: Afuera de la taberna de la costa
Ravenal declara que si hoy pierde un juego, sabe bien que mas tarde las cosas le saldrán mejor ("Till Good Luck Comes My Way"). 

Escena 4: El escenario del barco
Queenie y los trabajadores del barco cantan una canción que habla de mantener la desdicha lejos ("Mis'ry's Comin' Aroun"). Julie comienza cantando sola, pero al irse uniendo al canto los demás, de pronto grita, "¡Paren de cantar esa horrible canción!" Al fin consigue ensayar con Andy, Steve y el villano de la compañía, Frank Schultz.

Ellie llega retrasada y le habla al oído a Steve. Cuando este le pasa el mensaje a Julie en voz baja, esta se derrumba. A sabiendas de que el Sheriff está por llegar, Steve saca su navaja y le corta un dedo a Julie, succionando la sangre de este. Vallon llega haciéndole saber a Andy que en el Mississippi es contra la ley que una mujer negra contraiga matrimonio con un hombre blanco. En este caso, acusa a Julie (cuyo apellido es "Dozier") y a Steve, quien responde desafiante que el tiene sangre negra. Vallon les aconseja que Andy cancele el espectáculo de esa noche y se vaya de ahí. Para el desaliento de Magnolia, Steve y Julie, se van a empacar, abandonando a la compañía. Andy planea cancelar la función, pero se pregunta qué pasará mañana. Al final decide asignar el papel de Julie a Magnolia, quien conoce todas las líneas. Para ser su antagonista, Frank sugiere a un caballero al que acaba de conocer, entonces trae a Ravenal, a quien contratan inmediatamente. Julie se despide de Magnolia, quien comienza el ensayo trsitemente con el embelesado Ravenal.

Escena 5: Frente a la taquilla del barco
Ellie le canta a las muchachas de Natchez acerca de los sacrificios que se tienen que hacer para ser una actriz ("Life on the Wicked Stage"). Queenie entra en una venta vigorosa de boletos para el espectáculo (Queenie's Ballyhoo").

Escena 6: El escenario del barco
El melodrama se representa, con un abrazo entre "Parson Brown" (Ravenal) y "Miss Lucy" (Magnolia) el cual provoca un fuerte aplauso. Cuando Frank, representando al villano agarra a Magnolia, un patrocinador dispara su pistola en un arrebato!

Escena 7: La cubierta del barco
Sabiendo que Parthy estará preocupada e incapaz de intervenir, Ravenal convence a Magnolia a casarse con él al día siguiente. Los dos quedan estáticos ("You are Love").

Escena 8: El dique
El público ha sido invitado a la boda. Magnolia y Ravenal se dirigen hacia una iglesia de Natchez cuando Parthy se presenta junto con Vallon y Pete. Todos se escandalizan cuando Parthy acusa a Ravenal de habier asesinado a un hombre el año pasado. Vallon cuenta que Ravenal actuó en defensa propia, a lo que Andy no expresa objeción alguna admitiendo que él mismo, a los diecinueve años también mató a un hombre. Parthy se desvanece al escuchar que Magnolia y Ravenal van a contraer matrimonio. Andy anuncia que ahora pueden proceder con la ceremonia.

ACTO II

Escena 1: La Feria de Chicago - 1893
Ravenal y Magnolia se divierten con la gente de Chicago deslumbrados por la Exposición Colombina ("When the Sports of Gay Chicago"). Sintiendo que está de suerte, Ravenal se va a apostar. 

Escena 2: En una suite en la Casa Palmer, Chicago
Para Magnolia y Ravenal, su vida está llena de bendiciones ("Why do I love you?")

Escena 3: El Barco
Andy le lee a Parthy la carta de su hija describiendo su vida junto a Ravenal. Parthy desaprueba la forma en la que están gastando su dinero en lujos. Andy sugiere un viaje a Chicago para visitar a los Ravenal y a Kim, su hija.

Escena 4: Un cuarto en la Calle Ontario, Chicago, 1904
En una casa de huéspedes, Frank y Ellie hablan con la casera acerca de la renta de un cuarto. Debido a que sus actuales huéspedes no le han pagado la renta en varias semanas, Mrs. O'Brien planea deshacerse de ellos. Mrs. O'Brian revela que él, es un jugador y que todo lo que él y su esposa poseen ha sido empeñado. Frank y Ellie se sorprenden cuando ven a Magnolia llegar al lugar. Esta explica que están ahí temporalmente, solo para mudarse después junto con Ravenal a la orilla del lago. Presintiendo que Magnolia necesita dinero, Frank le ofrece un trabajo como cantante. Mrs. O'Brian le entrega una carta a Magnolia de parte de Ravenal, la cual contiene dinero para los gastos de la educación de Kim. Sin nada mas que empeñar y sin mas amigos que le presten dinero, Ravenal deja a Magnolia, esperando que ella y Kim regresen al lado de Andy y Parthy. Magnolia les dice a Frank y a Ellie que se rehúsa a vivir de la caridad de la gente, soportando el desapruebo de su madre. 

Escena 5: El Convento de Sta. Agatha, Chicago
Ravenal le explica a Kim que muy pronto tendrá que irse de "viaje de negocios". Kim le dice a su padre que cuando lo extrañe, hará lo que él siempre le dijo: Pretenderá que los dos están juntos. (Reprise, "Make Believe").

Escena 6: El Club del Trocadero
Jake, el Pianista, le cuenta a Max, el dueño del lugar, que Julie la cantante está pasando por un momento difícil. Steve la acaba de dejar diciendo que no puede competir con el otro hombre de su vida - "Johnnie Walker". Cando Julie aparece, Max la amenaza diciéndole que si falta al espectáculo de esa noche, se va a quedar sin trabajo. Julie ensaya una nueva canción ("Bill"). Frank quien ha sido contratado recientemente junto con Ellie como parte del acto cómico del trocadero, le pide a Max que le dé una audición a Magnolia. Viendo lo linda que ella es, Max da su consentimiento. Magnolia canta la canción que escuchó de Julie años atrás (Reprise "Can't Help Lovin' Dat Man"). Julie se sorprende al escuchar su voz y más aún al verla, aunque Magnolia no tiene ni la menor idea de que su vieja amiga está ahí. Tomando una desición, Julie se va. 

El canto de Magnolia es del agrado de Max, pero éste la hace enojar diciendo que la canción no le gusta. Alguien aparece con un mensaje de parte de Julie - Se ha ido llorando. Max la despide, pero hay mas del mensaje: Julie sugiere que contrate a la joven que acaba de audicionar. Frank anima a Magnolia a que intente la canción de nuevo pero a un ritmo más rápido y, cuando esta lo hace, Max le da el trabajo.

Escena 7: El vestíbulo de la Casa Palmer, Chicago
Llegando a tiempo para pasar el Año Nuevo, Parthy y Andy no pueden localizar a los Ravenal quienes creían que se estaban hospedando en la Casa Palmer. Parthy sale a buscarlos mientras que Andy coquetea con las atractivas mujeres. 

Escena 8: El Club del Trocadero, Víspera de Año Nuevo
La orquesta del Club y los bailarines hacen su acto ("Washington Post March"), seguidos por Ellie y Frank ("Goodbye, My Lady Love"). Sorprendido de ver a Andy, Frank le dice que Ravenal ha abandonado a Magnolia, quien ahora está actuando en el Club. Max le anuncia al público que "Julie Wendell" será reemplazada por Magnolia Ravenal, quien comienza con un vals dulce y sentimental ("After the Ball"). Cuando Magnolia ve a Andy en el público, su confianza se incrementa y ya para el final de su actuación el público termina cantando con ella. Magnolia abraza a su padre mientras todos gritan "¡Feliz Año Nuevo!"

Escena 9: Frente al Natchez Evening Democrat
Joe reflexiona sobre el Río Mississippi que nunca cambia. (Reprise "Ol' Man River")

Escena 10: Un teatro de Broadway
Un maestro de ceremonias anuncia a Magnolia, ahora convertida en una gran estrella. Ella canta dos canciones para el público de Ziegfeld Follies ("Dance Away the Night").

Escena 11: Afuera del Barco
Ravenal se encuentra con Andy, quien le informa del éxito en Europa de Magnolia y le cuenta que de hecho, ella actuará esa misma noche en el Barco. Ravenal, tristemente recuerda su amor por Magnolia (Reprise, "You Are Love")

Escena 12: El dique en Greenville, 1927
Después de cuarenta años juntos en el Barco, Queenie se siente frustrada con Joe, igual que siempre. Cuando una mujer halaga su vestido, Queenie le cuenta que fué un regalo que le hizo una estrella de Broadway, Ms. Ravenal. Luego deleita a la audiencia de Greenville con una canción del último show de Kim ("Hey, Feller!").

Mientras el público deja el barco después del espectáculo de esa noche, Magnolia ve a Ravenal. Él está a punto de implorar el perdon de Magnolia cuando una mujer de avanzada edad reconociendo a Magnolia los interrumpe. Esta señora recuerda bien el debut de Magnolia y al hombre apuesto que la miraba a ella con tal sentimiento y la manera tan encantadora en que ella lo miraba a él. "Y pensar que era solo una farza'" murmuró la señora, dándole a Magnolia las buenas noches.
Ravenal está de nuevo rogando perdón cuando Magnolia ve a Kim, quien corre a abrazar a su padre. Por un momento, la familia está reunida, mientras la voz de Joe se escucha una vez mas (Final: "Ol' Man River")

Traducción del Texto de Lyric Opera of Chicago.

 

Cast/Creative Team

Cast

Sasha Cooke*
Magnolia Hawks

Joseph Kaiser*
Gaylord Ravenal

Lara Teeter*
Cap'n Andy Hawks

Melody Moore*
Julie

Morris Robinson*
Joe

Marietta Simpson***
Queenie

Lauren Snouffer**
Ellie

Tye Blue*
Superintendent Frank

Cheryl Parrish
Parthy Ann Hawks

Creative Team

Patrick Summers
Conductor

Francesca Zambello
Director

Michele Lynch*
Choreographer

Peter J. Davison
Set Designer

Paul Tazewell*
Costume Designer

Mark McCullough*
Lighting Designer

Mark Grey*
Sound Designer

Richard Bado***
Chorus Master

Houston Grand Opera
Orchestra
Chorus


* HGO debut
** HGO Studio Artist
*** Former HGO Studio Artist

Support HGO

Donate Now Button on Support HGO 

To give by phone or for more information, contact Rebecca Kier at 713-546-0252 or rkier@houstongrandopera.org.

To submit your gift by mail, please use this form.

Loyal donors are behind each performance at Houston Grand Opera.
We can’t do it without you; please consider making a gift today!

Donate Now  

 


Jerome Kern's Show Boat
Book and Lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II
Sung in English 

Jan. 18, 2013 - 7:30 p.m. | Jan. 20, 2013 - 2 p.m. | Jan. 26, 2013 - 7:30 p.m.
Jan. 30, 2013 - 7:30 p.m. | Feb. 1, 2013 - 7:30 p.m. | Feb. 3, 2013 - 2 p.m.
Feb. 6, 2013 - 7:30 p.m. | Feb. 9, 2013 - 7:30 p.m.

Ol' Man River — he just keeps rolling along. Show Boat follows the theatrical family of The Cotton Blossom as it sails the Mississippi providing musical entertainment at towns along the river. A magical score and epic story make Show Boat a seminal work of the musical theater with a uniquely American accent.

A co-production with Lyric Opera of Chicago, San Francisco Opera, and Washington National Opera
Photo credit: Peter Davison

ACT I

Scene 1: The levee at Natchez on the Mississippi during the late 1880s
A show boat, the Cotton Blossom, is in town. When the boat's cook, Queenie, arrives from the market, Pete, the engineer, demands to know who gave her the brooch she's wearing, but she responds evasively. Stevedores and townsfolk assert that workers get no rest because of the show boat. Steve Baker, the boat's leading actor, has placed near the gangplank a picture frame showing his wife, leading lady Julie LaVerne. Pete steals the picture and stealthily heads for the towboat.

A crowd gathers to hear Captain Andy Hawks's description of the evening's show. Pete is furious that Julie gave his gift to her— the brooch— to Queenie. Seeing Pete pestering Julie, Steve exchanges blows with Pete, who is then fired by Captain Andy. Parthy, Andy's wife, despises show people and warns Julie to have nothing to do with her daughter, Magnolia. Ellie May Chipley, the company's comedienne, fails to persuade Andy to give her dramatic roles if Julie leaves the company.

A dashing gambler, Gaylord Ravenal, appears on the levee. He tells Sheriff Vallon he's there for a short time, but Vallon warns him not to stay more than twenty-four hours. Ravenal reflects on his carefree nature (“Who Cares If My Boat Goes Upstream?”). Suddenly, he sees Magnolia and is instantly captivated (“Make Believe”). When Vallon announces that the judge would like to see Ravenal, he excuses himself politely. Magnolia asks Joe, a worker on the show boat, whether he knows the young man she was talking to. He doesn't, but he's seen his kind before on the river. She rushes off to find Julie. Joe believes the river will know— it knows everything (“Ol' Man River”).

Scene 2: The show boat's kitchen
Magnolia tells Julie she's in love, although she doesn't know the young man's name. Julie worries that he's a “no-account river feller.” If he were, answers Magnolia, she'd stop loving him, but Julie knows otherwise and sings a song expressing her feelings (“Can't Help Lovin' Dat Man”). Queenie—surprised that Julie knows the song—adds her own exasperated verse about Joe.

Scene 3: Outside a waterfront saloon
Ravenal declares that if he loses at gambling today, he knows that things will go better for him later (“Till Good Luck Comes My Way”).

Scene 4: The show boat's stage
Queenie and the boat's workers sing a song about keeping unhappiness far away (“Mis‘ry's Comin' Aroun'”). Julie begins singing it herself, but as everyone joins with her, she suddenly cries out, “Stop singing that rotten song!” She manages to rehearse with Andy, Steve, and the company's resident villain, Frank Schultz.

Ellie, arriving late, whispers something in Steve's ear. When he whispers it to Julie, she collapses. Knowing the sheriff is on his way, Steve pulls out a knife, cuts Julie's finger, and sucks blood from it. Vallon arrives, informing Andy that in Mississippi it is unlawful for a Negro woman to marry a white man. In this case, he accuses Julie (whose last name he identifies as “Dozier”) and Steve, who defiantly responds that he has Negro blood in him. Vallon advises that Andy cancel that evening's performance and departs. To Magnolia's dismay, Steve and Julie—intending to leave the company—go off to pack. Andy plans to cancel the performance, but wonders about tomorrow. He decides to assign Julie's role to Magnolia, who knows all the lines. To play opposite her, Frank suggests a gentleman he just met. He brings in Ravenal, who is immediately hired. Julie says goodbye to Magnolia, who sadly begins rehearsing with the enraptured Ravenal.

Scene 5: In front of the show boat's box office
Ellie sings to the Natchez girls about the sacrifices one makes in being an actress (“Life on the Wicked Stage”). Queenie goes into a vigorous sales pitch for the show (“Queenie's Ballyhoo”).

Scene 6: Stage of the show boat
A melodrama is performed, with the embrace between “Parson Brown” (Ravenal) and “Miss Lucy” (Magnolia) drawing enthusiastic applause. When Frank, as the villain, grabs Magnolia, a patron shoots his gun in outrage!

Scene 7: The show boat's upper deck
Knowing Parthy will be preoccupied and unable to interfere, Ravenal convinces Magnolia to marry him the next day. The two are ecstatic (“You Are Love”).

Scene 8: The levee
The public is invited to the wedding. Magnolia and Ravenal are headed for a Natchez church when Parthy rushes in with Vallon and Pete. Everyone is shocked when Parthy accuses Ravenal of having killed a man the year before. Vallon admits that Ravenal got off on self-defense, at which Andy expresses no objection, admitting that when he was nineteen he, too, killed a man. Hearing that Magnolia and Ravenal are going to marry, Parthy faints. Andy declares that the wedding can now proceed.

ACT II

Scene 1: Chicago World's Fair – 1893
Ravenal and Magnolia make merry with Chicagoans, dazzled by the Columbian Exposition (“When the Sports of Gay Chicago”). Feeling that luck is with him, Ravenal goes off to gamble.
Scene 2. A suite at the Palmer House, Chicago
Life feels blissful for Magnolia and Ravenal (“Why Do I Love You?”).

Scene 3: The show boat
Andy reads Parthy their daughter's letter describing her life with Ravenal. Parthy disapproves of how much they are spending on luxuries. Andy proposes a trip to Chicago to see the Ravenals and Kim, their daughter.

Scene 4: A room on Ontario Street, Chicago, 1904
At a boarding house, Frank and Ellie ask the landlady about renting a room. Incensed that her current occupants haven't paid their rent in weeks, Mrs. O'Brien is planning to get rid of them. She reveals, too, that the man is a gambler and that everything he and his wife own has been pawned. Frank and Ellie are astonished when Magnolia arrives. She explains that these are temporary quarters, prior to her moving with Ravenal to the lake shore. Sensing that Magnolia needs money, Frank offers to get her a job singing. Mrs. O'Brien hands Magnolia a letter from Ravenal, enclosing money for Kim's school expenses. With nothing left to pawn and no more friends to lend them money, Ravenal is leaving Magnolia, hoping she and Kim will return to Andy and Parthy. Magnolia tells Frank and Ellie she refuses to live on charity while enduring her mother's disapproval.

Scene 5: St. Agatha's convent, Chicago
Ravenal explains to Kim that he must soon leave for “a business trip.” Kim tells her father that when she misses him, she does what he always told her to do – she pretends that they're together (Reprise: “Make Believe”).

Scene 6: The Trocadero Club
Jake, the pianist, tells Max, the owner, that Julie, their singer, is having a tough time: Steve has just left her, saying he couldn't compete with the other man in her life—“Johnnie Walker.” When Julie appears, Max threatens that if she misses the evening's show, she'll be out of a job. She rehearses a new song (“Bill”). Frank, recently hired with Ellie as the Trocadero's comedy act, asks Max to audition Magnolia. Seeing how lovely she is, he consents. She sings the song she'd heard Julie sing years before (Reprise: “Can't Help Lovin' Dat Man”). Julie is startled to hear her voice and then to see her, although Magnolia has no idea her old friend is there. Having made her decision, Julie leaves.

Magnolia's singing pleases Max, but he upsets her by saying he dislikes the song. The maître d' appears with a message from Julie—she's “going on a tear.” Max fires her, but there's more to the message: Julie suggests he hire the girl who just auditioned. Frank encourages Magnolia to try her song at a livelier tempo, and when she does so, Max gives her the job.

Scene 7: Lobby of the Palmer House, Chicago
Having arrived in time for New Year's Eve, Parthy and Andy can't locate the Ravenals, who they thought were staying at the Palmer House. Parthy goes off in search of them, while Andy flirts with some attractive ladies.

Scene 8: The Trocadero Club – New Year's Eve
The club's orchestra and dancers perform (“Washington Post March”), followed by Ellie and Frank (“I Might Fall Back on You”). Astonished to see Andy, Frank tells him that Ravenal has left Magnolia, who is now performing at the club. Max informs the audience that “Julie Wendell” will be replaced by Magnolia Ravenal, who quietly begins a sweetly sentimental waltz song (“After the Ball”). Seeing Andy in the audience increases her confidence, and by the end the crowd is singing along with her. She embraces her father as everyone shouts, “Happy New Year!”

Scene 9: In front of the Natchez Evening Democrat
Joe reflects on the never-changing Mississippi River (Reprise: “Ol' Man River”).

Scene 10: A Broadway theater
An emcee introduces Magnolia, now a great star. She sings two songs for the Ziegfeld Follies audience (“Nobody Else But You”).

Scene 11: Outside the show boat
Ravenal meets Andy, who informs him of Magnolia's European successes and that she is, in fact, on the show boat this very evening. Ravenal sadly recalls his love for Magnolia (Reprise: “You Are Love”).

Scene 12: Levee at Greenville—1927
After forty years together on the show boat, Queenie remains as frustrated as ever with Joe. When a woman compliments her on her dress, she reveals that it was a present from a Broadway star, Miss Ravenal. She delights the Greenville crowd with a song from Kim's latest show (“Hey, Feller!”).
As the audience leaves following the show boat's evening performance, Magnolia sees Ravenal. He is about to beg forgiveness when an old lady, recognizing Magnolia, interrupts. She remembers Magnolia's debut performance, the handsome young man who looked at her with such feeling, and the loving way she gazed at him. “And to think, it was only make believe,” murmurs the lady, bidding Magnolia good night.

Ravenal is again begging forgiveness when Magnolia sees Kim, who rushes to embrace her father. For one moment the family is united, as Joe's voice is heard once again (Finale: “Ol' Man River”).

Reprinted by permission of Lyric Opera of Chicago.


Sinópsis

 

ACTO I

Escena 1: El dique en Natchez, Mississippi a finales de 1880
Un barco de entretenimiento llamado Cotton Blossom ha llegado al pueblo. Cuando Queenie, la cocinera del barco regresa del mercado, el maquinista, Pete, le exije a esta que le diga quién le regaló el broche que trae puesto, pero ella le responde evasiva. Los obreros del puerto junto con la gente del pueblo afirman que no tienen ningún descanso a causa del barco. Steve Baker, el actor principal del barco ha puesto en la pasarela una foto de su esposa, la actriz principal Julie La Verne. Pete se roba la foto a hurtadillas dirigiéndose hacia el remolque.

Una multitud se reúne para escuchar al Capitán Andy Hawk en su descripción del espectáculo de la noche, Pete está furioso por que Julie le regaló el broche que él le dió a Queenie. Cuando Steve mira a Pete molestando a Julie, este comienza una golpiza con Pete, quien después es despedido por el Capitán Andy. La esposa de Andy, Parthy, siente aberración por el mundo del espectáculo y su gente y le advierte a Julie que no quiere que ella tenga nada que ver con su hija Magnolia. Ellie May Chipley, la comediante de la compañía, fracasa en su intento de convencer a Andy que le de los papeles dramáticos si es que Julie deja a la compañía.

Gaylord Ravenal, un apuesto jugador aparece en el dique y le cuenta al Sheriff Vallon que se quedará por poco tiempo, pero el Sheriff le advierte no quedarse por mas de veinticuatro horas. Ravenal reflexiona acerca de su actitud despreocupada ("Who Cares If My Boat Goes Upstream?"). De pronto, Ravenal mira a Magnolia y queda cautivado instantáneamente ("Make Believe"). Cuando Vallon anuncia que el juez quiere ver a Ravenal, este se retira cortésmente. Magnolia le pregunta a Joe, un trabajador del barco si es que conoce al joven hombre con quien ella estaba hablando. Este le dice que no lo conoce pero ha visto a muchos de su tipo en el río. Magnolia se apresura a buscando a Julie. Joe cree que el río lo sabrá. El río lo sabe todo. ("Ol' Man River").

Escena 2: La cocina del barco
Magnolia le cuenta a Julie que está enamorada, aunque aún no conozca el nombre del joven. A Julie le preocupa que pueda ser un tipo del río, de esos que no son de "fiar". Si así fuera, Magnolia replica, lo dejaría de amar, pero Julie sabe que no es asi y canta una canción expresando sus sentimientos ("Can't Help Lovin' Dat Man"). Queenie, sorprendida al ver que Julie conoce la canción, añade su propio verso exasperado acerca de Joe. 

Escena 3: Afuera de la taberna de la costa
Ravenal declara que si hoy pierde un juego, sabe bien que mas tarde las cosas le saldrán mejor ("Till Good Luck Comes My Way"). 

Escena 4: El escenario del barco
Queenie y los trabajadores del barco cantan una canción que habla de mantener la desdicha lejos ("Mis'ry's Comin' Aroun"). Julie comienza cantando sola, pero al irse uniendo al canto los demás, de pronto grita, "¡Paren de cantar esa horrible canción!" Al fin consigue ensayar con Andy, Steve y el villano de la compañía, Frank Schultz.

Ellie llega retrasada y le habla al oído a Steve. Cuando este le pasa el mensaje a Julie en voz baja, esta se derrumba. A sabiendas de que el Sheriff está por llegar, Steve saca su navaja y le corta un dedo a Julie, succionando la sangre de este. Vallon llega haciéndole saber a Andy que en el Mississippi es contra la ley que una mujer negra contraiga matrimonio con un hombre blanco. En este caso, acusa a Julie (cuyo apellido es "Dozier") y a Steve, quien responde desafiante que el tiene sangre negra. Vallon les aconseja que Andy cancele el espectáculo de esa noche y se vaya de ahí. Para el desaliento de Magnolia, Steve y Julie, se van a empacar, abandonando a la compañía. Andy planea cancelar la función, pero se pregunta qué pasará mañana. Al final decide asignar el papel de Julie a Magnolia, quien conoce todas las líneas. Para ser su antagonista, Frank sugiere a un caballero al que acaba de conocer, entonces trae a Ravenal, a quien contratan inmediatamente. Julie se despide de Magnolia, quien comienza el ensayo trsitemente con el embelesado Ravenal.

Escena 5: Frente a la taquilla del barco
Ellie le canta a las muchachas de Natchez acerca de los sacrificios que se tienen que hacer para ser una actriz ("Life on the Wicked Stage"). Queenie entra en una venta vigorosa de boletos para el espectáculo (Queenie's Ballyhoo").

Escena 6: El escenario del barco
El melodrama se representa, con un abrazo entre "Parson Brown" (Ravenal) y "Miss Lucy" (Magnolia) el cual provoca un fuerte aplauso. Cuando Frank, representando al villano agarra a Magnolia, un patrocinador dispara su pistola en un arrebato!

Escena 7: La cubierta del barco
Sabiendo que Parthy estará preocupada e incapaz de intervenir, Ravenal convence a Magnolia a casarse con él al día siguiente. Los dos quedan estáticos ("You are Love").

Escena 8: El dique
El público ha sido invitado a la boda. Magnolia y Ravenal se dirigen hacia una iglesia de Natchez cuando Parthy se presenta junto con Vallon y Pete. Todos se escandalizan cuando Parthy acusa a Ravenal de habier asesinado a un hombre el año pasado. Vallon cuenta que Ravenal actuó en defensa propia, a lo que Andy no expresa objeción alguna admitiendo que él mismo, a los diecinueve años también mató a un hombre. Parthy se desvanece al escuchar que Magnolia y Ravenal van a contraer matrimonio. Andy anuncia que ahora pueden proceder con la ceremonia.

ACTO II

Escena 1: La Feria de Chicago - 1893
Ravenal y Magnolia se divierten con la gente de Chicago deslumbrados por la Exposición Colombina ("When the Sports of Gay Chicago"). Sintiendo que está de suerte, Ravenal se va a apostar. 

Escena 2: En una suite en la Casa Palmer, Chicago
Para Magnolia y Ravenal, su vida está llena de bendiciones ("Why do I love you?")

Escena 3: El Barco
Andy le lee a Parthy la carta de su hija describiendo su vida junto a Ravenal. Parthy desaprueba la forma en la que están gastando su dinero en lujos. Andy sugiere un viaje a Chicago para visitar a los Ravenal y a Kim, su hija.

Escena 4: Un cuarto en la Calle Ontario, Chicago, 1904
En una casa de huéspedes, Frank y Ellie hablan con la casera acerca de la renta de un cuarto. Debido a que sus actuales huéspedes no le han pagado la renta en varias semanas, Mrs. O'Brien planea deshacerse de ellos. Mrs. O'Brian revela que él, es un jugador y que todo lo que él y su esposa poseen ha sido empeñado. Frank y Ellie se sorprenden cuando ven a Magnolia llegar al lugar. Esta explica que están ahí temporalmente, solo para mudarse después junto con Ravenal a la orilla del lago. Presintiendo que Magnolia necesita dinero, Frank le ofrece un trabajo como cantante. Mrs. O'Brian le entrega una carta a Magnolia de parte de Ravenal, la cual contiene dinero para los gastos de la educación de Kim. Sin nada mas que empeñar y sin mas amigos que le presten dinero, Ravenal deja a Magnolia, esperando que ella y Kim regresen al lado de Andy y Parthy. Magnolia les dice a Frank y a Ellie que se rehúsa a vivir de la caridad de la gente, soportando el desapruebo de su madre. 

Escena 5: El Convento de Sta. Agatha, Chicago
Ravenal le explica a Kim que muy pronto tendrá que irse de "viaje de negocios". Kim le dice a su padre que cuando lo extrañe, hará lo que él siempre le dijo: Pretenderá que los dos están juntos. (Reprise, "Make Believe").

Escena 6: El Club del Trocadero
Jake, el Pianista, le cuenta a Max, el dueño del lugar, que Julie la cantante está pasando por un momento difícil. Steve la acaba de dejar diciendo que no puede competir con el otro hombre de su vida - "Johnnie Walker". Cando Julie aparece, Max la amenaza diciéndole que si falta al espectáculo de esa noche, se va a quedar sin trabajo. Julie ensaya una nueva canción ("Bill"). Frank quien ha sido contratado recientemente junto con Ellie como parte del acto cómico del trocadero, le pide a Max que le dé una audición a Magnolia. Viendo lo linda que ella es, Max da su consentimiento. Magnolia canta la canción que escuchó de Julie años atrás (Reprise "Can't Help Lovin' Dat Man"). Julie se sorprende al escuchar su voz y más aún al verla, aunque Magnolia no tiene ni la menor idea de que su vieja amiga está ahí. Tomando una desición, Julie se va. 

El canto de Magnolia es del agrado de Max, pero éste la hace enojar diciendo que la canción no le gusta. Alguien aparece con un mensaje de parte de Julie - Se ha ido llorando. Max la despide, pero hay mas del mensaje: Julie sugiere que contrate a la joven que acaba de audicionar. Frank anima a Magnolia a que intente la canción de nuevo pero a un ritmo más rápido y, cuando esta lo hace, Max le da el trabajo.

Escena 7: El vestíbulo de la Casa Palmer, Chicago
Llegando a tiempo para pasar el Año Nuevo, Parthy y Andy no pueden localizar a los Ravenal quienes creían que se estaban hospedando en la Casa Palmer. Parthy sale a buscarlos mientras que Andy coquetea con las atractivas mujeres. 

Escena 8: El Club del Trocadero, Víspera de Año Nuevo
La orquesta del Club y los bailarines hacen su acto ("Washington Post March"), seguidos por Ellie y Frank ("Goodbye, My Lady Love"). Sorprendido de ver a Andy, Frank le dice que Ravenal ha abandonado a Magnolia, quien ahora está actuando en el Club. Max le anuncia al público que "Julie Wendell" será reemplazada por Magnolia Ravenal, quien comienza con un vals dulce y sentimental ("After the Ball"). Cuando Magnolia ve a Andy en el público, su confianza se incrementa y ya para el final de su actuación el público termina cantando con ella. Magnolia abraza a su padre mientras todos gritan "¡Feliz Año Nuevo!"

Escena 9: Frente al Natchez Evening Democrat
Joe reflexiona sobre el Río Mississippi que nunca cambia. (Reprise "Ol' Man River")

Escena 10: Un teatro de Broadway
Un maestro de ceremonias anuncia a Magnolia, ahora convertida en una gran estrella. Ella canta dos canciones para el público de Ziegfeld Follies ("Dance Away the Night").

Escena 11: Afuera del Barco
Ravenal se encuentra con Andy, quien le informa del éxito en Europa de Magnolia y le cuenta que de hecho, ella actuará esa misma noche en el Barco. Ravenal, tristemente recuerda su amor por Magnolia (Reprise, "You Are Love")

Escena 12: El dique en Greenville, 1927
Después de cuarenta años juntos en el Barco, Queenie se siente frustrada con Joe, igual que siempre. Cuando una mujer halaga su vestido, Queenie le cuenta que fué un regalo que le hizo una estrella de Broadway, Ms. Ravenal. Luego deleita a la audiencia de Greenville con una canción del último show de Kim ("Hey, Feller!").

Mientras el público deja el barco después del espectáculo de esa noche, Magnolia ve a Ravenal. Él está a punto de implorar el perdon de Magnolia cuando una mujer de avanzada edad reconociendo a Magnolia los interrumpe. Esta señora recuerda bien el debut de Magnolia y al hombre apuesto que la miraba a ella con tal sentimiento y la manera tan encantadora en que ella lo miraba a él. "Y pensar que era solo una farza'" murmuró la señora, dándole a Magnolia las buenas noches.
Ravenal está de nuevo rogando perdón cuando Magnolia ve a Kim, quien corre a abrazar a su padre. Por un momento, la familia está reunida, mientras la voz de Joe se escucha una vez mas (Final: "Ol' Man River")

Traducción del Texto de Lyric Opera of Chicago.

 

Cast

Sasha Cooke*
Magnolia Hawks

Joseph Kaiser*
Gaylord Ravenal

Lara Teeter*
Cap'n Andy Hawks

Melody Moore*
Julie

Morris Robinson*
Joe

Marietta Simpson***
Queenie

Lauren Snouffer**
Ellie

Tye Blue*
Superintendent Frank

Cheryl Parrish
Parthy Ann Hawks

Creative Team

Patrick Summers
Conductor

Francesca Zambello
Director

Michele Lynch*
Choreographer

Peter J. Davison
Set Designer

Paul Tazewell*
Costume Designer

Mark McCullough*
Lighting Designer

Mark Grey*
Sound Designer

Richard Bado***
Chorus Master

Houston Grand Opera
Orchestra
Chorus


* HGO debut
** HGO Studio Artist
*** Former HGO Studio Artist

Donate Now Button on Support HGO 

To give by phone or for more information, contact Rebecca Kier at 713-546-0252 or rkier@houstongrandopera.org.

To submit your gift by mail, please use this form.

Loyal donors are behind each performance at Houston Grand Opera.
We can’t do it without you; please consider making a gift today!

Donate Now  


You can purchase tickets online until 4 p.m. CST on the day of the performance (Noon CST on the day of a matinee performance). Please call our Customer Care Center at 713-228-OPERA (6737) or 800-62-OPERA (800-626-7372) if you have questions or have other ticketing needs.

How Many Seats? Groups of ten or more receive discounts and special seating! Please call 713-546-0248 or e-mail groups@HoustonGrandOpera.org to learn more about Group Sales.

All sales are final. Latecomers will be seated during an intermission. The use of cameras or recording devices is strictly forbidden at HGO performances. Dates, casting and programs are subject to change without notice.

[Back to Calendar]

Calendar
July>
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
293012345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
272829303112
3456789


Join our e-mail list and stay up-to-date on events and news Join our e-mail list
Follow Us